• @Pr0v3n@lemmy.world
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    734 months ago

    The 3 H’s. When someone in your life comes up to you with a problem, you either figure out, or ask them; if they want to be Hugged, Heard or Helped.

    A lot of the time when someone is venting at you, they just want to be heard and understood, and I’m the type of man to want to immediately fix the issue, and it’s a bit invasive and often off the mark, so I reign myself in and ask them if they want to be Hugged, Heard or Helped. More often than not, they just want to vent and don’t want me butting in with solutions to their issues.

    So the next time someone confides in you, take a step back and analyse how you should respond going forward, it really helped me understand more.

    • @Socket462@feddit.it
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      184 months ago

      Wow great advice and also works in Italian if you change H with A: Abbracciare, Ascoltare, Aiutare.

    • @FoD@startrek.website
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      64 months ago

      Love this idea. It’s an idea that’s easy to break down to children as well, help them narrow down their options when someone is talking to them.

      This is one that will stick with me for sure.

  • SharkEatingBreakfast
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    524 months ago

    “You’re an adult. You get to enjoy whatever you like.”

    Stuffed animals? Legos? Video games? Cartoons? I’ve been made fun of all my life for liking “stupid stuff” or “kid stuff” (even as a kid).

    I pay my taxes. I’ve lived life long enough to know that I deserve to be happy. What kind of miserable shit-head would make fun of me enjoying something? Someone whose opinion has no value to me, that’s who.

    • ThyTTY
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      84 months ago

      Thanks, I needed to hear that. The voice in my head not allowing me to enjoy “stupid things” is sometimes unbearable

      • SharkEatingBreakfast
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        104 months ago

        If it brings you joy, it’s definitely not stupid.

        I look back and regret not embracing things I had interest in.

        I was made fun of for my Pokémon cards so I threw them away. I was told that my drawings are weird so I stopped. After being constantly told that video games were “a stupid waste of time” and that I “should be doing something productive”, I boxed them up and gave them away.

        Now Pokémon cards are cool and there are worldwide tournaments. I look wistfully at talented artists & animators and wish I hadn’t given up. Video games can now be considered “art” and are openly enjoyed by so many.

        I’m too old to let others dictate what I should & shouldn’t like. I wear fun clothes, collect stuffed animals, nerd out over Zelda lore, paint miniatures for DnD games. Why? Because I enjoy it and I deserve to be happy in what I like.

        I hope that you will one day feel that you are able to enjoy things openly, too.

        Chin up. Enjoy your happiness.

    • @Num10ck@lemmy.world
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      34 months ago

      some adults enjoy making fun of other people. they are often miserable shit-heads of course, but let them enjoy their hobby too. doesnt hurt to be able to laugh at yourself.

      • @laughterlaughter@lemmy.world
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        144 months ago

        No, fuck that. That’s like the paradox of tolerance or free speech - “tolerate the intolerant,” “hate speech is free speech.”

        I liked how someone else put it a few months ago: tolerance comes with a contract: tolerate everyone. If you break this contract, you’re OUT.

        So, yeah. I’ll live and let you live - as long as you don’t step on my toes. As soon as that happens, I’ll tell you to fuck right off (not you, OP, but that ‘miserable adult making fun of me.’)

        Of course, if the other party is just being genuinely and harmlessly funny, that’s another story.

  • @khannie@lemmy.world
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    404 months ago

    My father once told me that as soon as you notice that you’re tipsy it’s time to ease down.

    Even if you stop immediately you’re going to continue getting more drunk from the alcohol sitting in your stomach waiting to be absorbed.

    Wise words that have really stuck with me and definitely helps on nights out.

    • BruceTwarzen
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      74 months ago

      I stopped drinking like 10 years ago and i find it fascinating how hard it is to just stop drinking. I never really liked the taste of alcohol, so i had kind of a hard time to get tipsy, but then it snowballed. I talked about this with my frinds who were bigger drinkes than me often. The conversation was always like:" you know how you get drunk, having a grand old time, and instead of stopping, you just keep going, and it’s never getting better, just worse?" And we often tried to stay in the sweet spot, but everything ALWAYS went out of control, well knowing that it’s gonna end up bad.

      • @khannie@lemmy.world
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        64 months ago

        Oof, that’s rough. Congratulations on staying off the drink for 10 years though. That’s really solid work. Very impressive.

        I personally can keep myself in the sweet spot all night and well into the next morning and almost never get messy and truly believe it’s down to that “Ease down, son. You’ve a stomach full of booze to come” that pops into my head.

  • knightly the Sneptaur
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    4 months ago

    “Anything worth doing is worth doing half-assed”.

    It’s an inversion of the saying that ends in “worth doing well”, and it sticks with me because it’s genuinely good advice.

    Like, turning in a half-completed assignment for a failing grade is way less harmful to one’s GPA than failing to turn in anything and taking a “0”. I might not have the energy after work to do all of my laundry, but knocking out one load is still better than none. Frozen dinners might not be healthy, but skipping meals would be worse.

    You can’t whole-ass everything all the time, but half-ass is better than no-ass. 😸

    • @cynar@lemmy.world
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      74 months ago

      It also helps overcome the paralysis of perfection.

      Sometimes just producing something will do far more to help you improve than any amount of prep work. Do a half arsed job, then figure out where you actually need to improve it. By that point you will have a lot more momentum to keep working on it, and a lot more idea where to focus.

        • @cynar@lemmy.world
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          14 months ago

          Fully agreed.

          With depression it’s more of a lethargy paralysis. It makes you feel like it’s too hard, and not worth all the effort. Once you are moving , it becomes more obvious how hollow that feeling is. It often doesn’t go away, but can be fought against. I suspect it’s why exercise is helpful for some, but not others. It helps get you into the mindset of doing things. When it’s mild enough, this can shatter the false walls on your mind.

          • @Churbleyimyam@lemm.ee
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            24 months ago

            Yeah, that’s definitely been my experience of it. I read somewhere that the evolutionary basis for it is to prevent action when previous action has had consistently bad outcomes. It encourages hiding until external conditions improve. And apparently it’s the same for most animals. Appropriately tragic, isn’t it?

            • @cynar@lemmy.world
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              14 months ago

              Ultimately, humans are quite poorly designed for modern life. Our minds haven’t significantly changed since we were chasing herbivores across the savannah. Our bodies never even finished coming down from the trees. The fact we function as a modern society is actually quite impressive.

              Depression is likely a bunch of different instincts and survival methods messing each other up. It’s likely got ties to hiding. It also likely has got ties to hibernation, along with 101 other minor instincts that can no longer serve their original purpose.

              I do know that “learned helplessness” is common to most mammals. Rats can show it, along with depression, when conditions get weird enough. It makes sense as a fall back. Huddle down and save energy until something changes for the better.

              One of our biggest advantages is our rational brain. Stopping our own instincts is like trying to stop a goods train. What we can do is be smart. We can reach in and tweak the controls, change the signals. It’s hard, particularly with things like depression clouding our thoughts. But it can be done.

              I am a ghost in the machine, inside of a bodged together biological computer, piloting a poorly designed meat mech. It’s completely absurd, but if I don’t take control of it, who the hell will?

  • @PunnyName@lemmy.world
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    324 months ago

    “Is this gonna matter at your funeral?” A friend asked me this once.

    Questions the gravity of the circumstances, and how much you should care (if at all).

    • @KnightontheSun@lemmy.world
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      84 months ago

      Will you really remember this event in five hours, or five days, or five years?

      React accordingly. I’m not the best at it so I have to keep reminding my self of this.

  • @notabot@lemm.ee
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    304 months ago

    “Make it easy for them to give you what you want”

    There’s a lot of ways to interpret that, and most of them help. For instance, if you’re asking your boss for a raise, if you just say “Hey boss, gimme a raise” you’re making it hard for them. If you say “I think I deserve a raise, here are multiple, documented, examples of where I’ve helped increase revenue/fix a problem that could have cost us/improved customer retention/etc” then you’re making it easier for them because they have a list of positives to justify it.

    Generally if you’re asking a question you need an answer to, or for something in particular, spend a little time thinking about the request from the other person’s point of view. What do they need to be able, and inclined, to help you? When you know that, make sure you supply it.

    I’ve found it to be a powerful way of approaching discussions, and it can make a lot of situations make more sense when you realize one party didn’t do it and didn’t get what they want.

    Sometimes, of course, making it easy to give you what you want just means making any other outcome harder instead. >:)

  • @bazus1@lemmy.world
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    244 months ago

    This was given to me during a Process Safety class in college, and I’ll never forget it: in the workplace, “Always have a stupid-question buddy.” Try your best to direct your questions to someone who’s not your boss as you learn the ropes. That way, you can be comfortable asking those questions on basics that really need to be asked in order to do your job properly, and not look like an idiot to the person that performs your performance reviews.

  • @thisisnotgoingwell@programming.dev
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    234 months ago

    Salvador Dalí: ‘Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce nothing.’

    I wish I would have heard this quote much sooner… I usually like to flesh out my projects/ideas from the start and it feels unoriginal or boring when it’s too derivative of other work… But everything is derivative of something. Being afraid of being “unoriginal” should never stop you from creating, or at least trying. A lot of the time the “unoriginal” work pays great homage to the original work and really does transform the result to something new and vibrant

  • @ThatWeirdGuy1001@lemmy.world
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    224 months ago

    This is gonna sound dumb af but meh.

    “Don’t be scared of it”

    The context was flipping eggs for the first time because I was being too cautious about breaking the yolk. My coworker said it in passing and probably never thought of it again but over the years it’s translated into a lot of stuff.

    So yeah, don’t be scared of it.

    • @solarbabies@lemmy.world
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      44 months ago

      I was going to share mine from my aunt until I saw this is… basically the same thing!

      “Don’t let fear control your decisions.”

      It’s just the context was trauma & not eggs lol.

    • ඞmir
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      14 months ago

      This sounds like a different flavor of “just do it”

  • @FoD@startrek.website
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    4 months ago

    I actually do not remember where I heard this, but I was unhappy at one of my past workplaces, and I felt like nothing made sense anymore. The purpose of my job, the product, the people… I would ask why or seek deeper understanding and received nothing back.

    The advice was “when no one has your back, it’s time to move your back”.

    It stuck with me because it applies to friends, family, work, and life in general. If you do not feel supported and able to give support back mutually then it’s time to place yourself in a situation more beneficial for you and those around you.

    It doesn’t place blame, it’s simply a validation statement - you feel x, so do y.

  • @BonesOfTheMoon@lemmy.world
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    204 months ago

    My no nonsense easten European coworker once said “If you have even one red flag about your relationship, get out and don’t look back. Don’t waste your time.” She’s completely right. Get out before you get mired into a situation that’ll never change.

    One thing that Reddit did teach me is that work doesn’t really matter and you shouldn’t knock yourself out for any job, because they’d replace you in a heartbeat and will underpay and micromanage you no matter how good a job you do.

    • @graymess@lemmy.world
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      74 months ago

      Not sure that first bit of advice is a good blanket policy, but it depends on who’s deciding how significant a negative trait must be to constitute a red flag. Some will take this advice to mean you should expect nothing short of perfection and that’s just unrealistic. If you walk away from every flaw you find, you’ll be alone. My partner and I have been together 13 years. We are well aware of each other’s flaws, so we work on them and do what we can to mitigate the impact they have on our relationship. But we also both know that if either of us does something egregious that crosses the line, that ends the relationship. Unconditional love is stupid. There should always be conditions.

      Anyway, I think it’s useful to pair that advice with “know what your red flags are” so you can identify and separate the imperfections from the deal breakers.

      • @BonesOfTheMoon@lemmy.world
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        94 months ago

        I think red flag means something more extreme. Like not “can’t handle failing” which is just human and more “act out in their failures by racking up their credit cards”. Which is tactical manipulation.

    • @ChunkMcHorkle@lemmy.world
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      4 months ago

      That’s great advice, and it pairs well with all the words of wisdom regarding not speaking or acting in anger.

      Often people threaten in situations where they know they are powerless and cannot act, whether on a threat or anything else. When you have power and you know it, you act differently, more confidently, and as though you know nothing is lost by keeping the mouth shut until ready to act.

      But your threats speak for you as well. They warn your opponent how and where you intend to strike them, should you ever be able to do so, and tell an observant enemy exactly how you think and what would frighten or piss you off, because that’s what you’re trying to do to them by threatening them.

      Your entire appearance, tone of voice, and choice of words also tell an opponent a lot of the real truth about your immediate attitude and maturity level, and whether you’re personally even worth changing their course to help.

      Threats are a product of fear and anger, and are not nearly as threatening as the people making them think they are. If you want to threaten, act cool and confident. Laugh at them when they start getting flustered.

      “Oh” and “heh, okay” are how to respond to threats being made to you, like they just don’t matter and your real position is whatever pal, if it makes you feel better. This level of near-total non-response gives you time to evaluate the situation and do nothing you’ll regret, or to do something later that you’ve planned out far better than making angry threats in the heat of the moment.

      Threats are almost always the most stupid tactic there is. You’re gonna call my boss and have my job? Not before I call him, lol. But thanks for letting me know. Have a nice day.

      This is how threats telegraph weakness to people who are accustomed to holding power. If you want someone to know for sure you hold no cards, start whipping out threats.

      TL;DR: Threats are best avoided until you are truly ready to act. And if you can’t act, keep it shut until you can.

  • @SendMePhotos@lemmy.world
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    154 months ago

    “everyone knows something that you don’t.” it helps me to not be an arrogant dick. People are good at something.

    “everyone believes they’re the hero of their own story” too many people are set on their ways and sometimes its best to realize that you can’t change their mind. Just move on and don’t get all worked up.

  • @swallowyourmind@lemmy.world
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    154 months ago

    Not religious, but “Steady plodding bring prosperity”.

    All my life I have watched as many of those around me struggle to stay consistent in their lives, and have worse outcomes as a result.

    Inconsistent with their savings habits.

    Inconsistent in their employment efforts.

    Inconsistent with their love lives.

    Inconsistent with taking care of themselves.

    Consistency provides a basis for better long term results. Very little success is possible in almost any endeavor without it.

    Though I’ve found it personally frustrating to remain consistent in my own life, the benefits of doing so I have found to be exponential, although late and taken for granted by others who weren’t consistent.

    Another is: “What are you willing to give up to get what you want?”

    All too many things are zero-sum, and though consumer capitalist systems often pretend “you can have it all”, you can’t.

    Honest reflection about what is most important to yourself, and what personal sacrifices are required to obtain your goal, makes the goal easier to obtain.

    Many sacrifices that are needed are clear from the offset, but by being honest and willing before the endeavour, those future sacrifices are less traumatic. Other sacrifices pop up along the way, and it’s important to re-evaluate at intervals whether your end goal is still worth it.

    For love: “Prequalify your spouse.”

    People lead with their hearts often where their heads can’t follow.

    Sure they may be attractive, or have an amazing personality, or be rich, but do you KNOW them?

    Is their fading beauty or quick wit or checking balance able to really make up for their poor treatment of others, latent racism or sexism, politics, religious adherence, stance on having children, intention in the future to care for ailing family, or poor spending habits? What about if they believe it’s appropriate to hit your future kids, or demand the kids are their religion, or can’t be gay? What if they refuse to travel or relocate? What if they don’t clean up after themselves or never take responsibility for their failings?

    It is imperative to long term relationship success that you spend enough time for both partners to actually understand each other, because there is more to long term compatibility related to shared values than there is to sexual attraction.

    Most often this advice results in people realizing they haven’t given enough thought themselves to what and why they believe is the best way to live their own lives, and where those values came from.

    I’ve got loads more, but those are a great start.